Donna Eshelman: Seven Keys to Skilled Movement

ABOUT
DONNA
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ACTING
COACH
THE
STELLALIGN®
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ANALYSIS
RESOURCES CONTACT
alignment
strength
flexibility
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kinesthetic perception
the nervous system
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THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
Harnessing the power of the brain
A new key and a key of the future


One of the most powerful keys to skill improvement works with the nervous system as it relates to conscious movement, in particular the Feldenkrais Method® of neuromuscular reeducation. What Moshe Feldenkrais knew back in the 1940's, neuroscientists are proving today with technology and research studies. The most exciting discovery is that the brain can change and improve far more than we previously believed possible, especially the part of the brain that controls our movement.

Feldenkrais taught that by moving slow enough for your more slow-acting motor cortex to notice what you are doing, your body recognizes the efficiency of the new pattern and integrates it. Unlike many fitness teachings, which offer repetitive corrections ("Relax your shoulders. Relax your shoulders."), the Feldenkrais Method® puts you on the floor for a lesson that teaches your brain to change the signals being sent to the shoulder girdle muscles. In this example, the result is less tension in the muscles. The student stands up and has relaxed shoulders without trying to relax them. The brain created an immediate improvement. The results from these lessons may include improved balance, increased flexibility, and enhanced stability. This work is extremely powerful and produces tremendous, long-lasting improvements and efficiency in movement skill. A body that trains in this method often feels more youthful and more comfortable.

OLD WAY OF THINKING
Stiffness and poor posture must happen to me as I age
I carry my tension in my shoulders
I am not flexible
No pain, No gain
NEW WAY OF THINKING
I can increase flexibility and improve posture as I age
I do not have to carry tension
I can become more flexible than I realize
Pain equals strain, and should be avoided
OLD WAY OF MOVING
When I walk I hold my abdominals and torso strong
NEW WAY OF MOVING
When I walk, my ribs, spine, and pelvis move.
©2011 Donna Eshelman, All Rights Reserved.
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